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A new year is sure rife with resolutions — little (or big) tweaks Americans promise to make in order to improve their life, their everyday. However, according to a study conducted by U.S. News, about 80% of America’s resolutions get tossed by February — the second week of the month, to be exact.

If you’re a veteran, and your resolution revolves around implementing a sturdy, dependable workout routine in order to get fitter, healthier, or both, there are two things that can help better ensure success: one, securely message your VA health care team by clicking here to get their professional opinion (and help, if necessary) and two, mimic (as best you can) the following seven-day workout plan from Dan Dailey, the youngest soldier to ever serve as Sergeant Major of the United States Army (h/t: Army Times).

Monday: Five or six or seven mile run, outside (rain or sunshine).

Tuesday: Upper body and core.

For the upper body: 10 reps of free weight dumbbell bench presses and dumbbell curls.

For the core: 100 crunches on an exercise ball, followed by 150 crunches on the ball or floor. He follows those up with two sets of 75 sit-ups.

After the four sets he he finishes with 15 tricep dips followed by bicep burnouts, where you run dumbbell curls as fast as you can until you reach muscle failure. The target is 30 reps on each side. He repeats this four times as well.

Wednesday: Five or six or seven mile run, outside (rain or sunshine).

Thursday: Pull-ups/pushups and sit-ups (modify as you see fit).

One pull-up followed by five pushups.

Two pull-ups followed by 10 pushups.

Three pull-ups followed by 15 pushups.

Four pull-ups followed by 20 pushups.

Five pull-ups followed by 25 pushups.

Six pull-ups followed by 30 pushups.

Seven pull-ups followed by 35 pushups.

Eight pull-ups followed by 40 pushups, followed by 100 sit-ups or crunches and 25 left oblique and 25 right oblique crunches.

Nine pull-ups followed by 45 pushups, followed by 100 sit-ups or crunches and 25 left oblique and 25 right oblique crunches.

Ten pull-ups followed by 50 pushups, followed by 100 sit-ups or crunches and 25 left oblique and 25 right oblique crunches.

Nine pull-ups followed by 100 sit-ups or crunches and 25 left oblique and 25 right oblique crunches.

Eight pull-ups followed by 90 sit-ups or crunches.

Seven pull-ups followed by 80 sit-ups or crunches.

Six pull-ups followed by 70 sit-ups or crunches.

Five pull-ups followed by 60 sit-ups or crunches.

Four pull-ups followed by 50 sit-ups or crunches.

Three pull-ups followed by 40 sit-ups or crunches.

Two pull-ups followed by 30 sit-ups or crunches.

One pull-up followed by 20 sit-ups or crunches.

Friday: Five or six or seven mile run, outside (rain or sunshine).

Saturday: Rest!

Sunday: An optional day. In other words, something recreational like playing basketball, or running, or biking, etc.

Nutrition can also be tied in. For instance, Dailey follows some basic rules (also via Army Times):

Dailey also tries to stick to a low-carb, low-fat diet, “but I splurge, too,” he said.

“The reason why I can have a treat here and there is because I do run a lot,” Dailey said, laughing. “I’m not the best healthy eater in the world.”

Dailey and his wife try to eat fish two or three times a week, and they limit their red meat intake.

“And I try to never drink my calories,” he said. “Almost never in a week will I drink a calorie. It’s just a thing I’ve done my entire adult life.”

Dailey typically starts his day with hardboiled egg whites, and he’ll have chicken breast and a salad for lunch. Dinner is whatever his wife, Holly, has planned, he said.