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For direct online access to VA benefits and resources, create an account here.

Are you or someone you know in crisis? There are options.

On average, 22 veterans commit suicide every day. 22. Every. Single. Day.

It’s hard to fathom the pain the service members felt that made them believe that their only way out was that one ultimate, tragic decision. One their family and friends had to, somehow, cope with. A hurt that seems insurmountable. Grief that will, somehow, always linger.

Because the reality is that these service members, these veterans, are no longer with us. But they could’ve been.

Because the reality is that these service members, these veterans, are no longer with us. But they could’ve been.

According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, here are nine key warning signs to look for in a vet who might be enduring a mental health crisis and/or considering hurting themselves:

**Many veterans don’t display any warning signs of an urge to hurt themselves

Some veterans, however, will  …

– Seem sad, depressed, anxious or agitated (more than usual)

– Sleep a lot, or not really at all

– Have no regard for their appearance, or their wellbeing

– Will stop talking/associating with friends, family or even their society or community

– Lose interest in things they previously were very passionate about

– Express excessive guilt or shame, failure — or say they “feel trapped”

– Start performing worse at work or at school

– Take risks, act extremely dangerously

– Give special personal items away, draft a will, ask/seek access to pills or guns (all potential preparation for suicide)

For more information on suicide prevention (as well as PTSD and depression), click here.