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The Wounded Warrior Project hasn’t exactly been having a spectacular 2016. Especially in the public eye.

First it was outed that the charity — now the 38th largest in the United States, and one that hauled in more than $300 million in donations in 2014 alone — spends just as much on itself as it does on injured military veterans (and lavish parties and grand entrances by its showy, flamboyant leader).

Then it was reported that many of its former employees and WOUNDED WARRIORS themselves were fired for reasons relating to their post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) — one of the maladies that the charity says it works so hard to combat.

And now this.

A revelation that the charity is suing disabled veterans.

From News4Jax out of Florida:

News4Jax found two lawsuits filed in Duval County by WWP against fellow injured veterans formerly employed by the non-profit. Both of those veterans declined to talk to News4Jax.

Sources said however, both wounded veterans, named in the lawsuits had PTSD and that’s part of why they were fired from the charity. Both lawsuits only show WWP’s side, claiming the injured veterans violated their severance agreements.

Documents show one disabled veteran and a woman, was sued because WWP found a copy of her severance agreement in the hands of an Indiana charity – also being sued by WWP.

The second injured veteran, a man, is being sued because a donor rescinded his $2,400 donation to WWP after finding out that warrior had been fired.

In that second lawsuit, WWP demanded more than $52,000 from him – his $50,000 severance plus damages and attorney fees.

Court records show both lawsuits are still open.

According to their financials, the Wounded Warrior Project spent about $1.4 million on legal fees in just one year, 2014.

But that’s not all.

The “nonprofit” organization has also reportedly bullied other veteran-focused nonprofits … for boatloads of cash.

This also from News4Jax:

An online search showed a Nebraska-based charity had to give $1.7 million to WWP for having the term “wounded warrior” in their name, even though that charity existed before Wounded Warrior Project.

Another charity, Keystone Wounded Warriors, was sued for having the name and what WWP deemed a similar logo. That charity reported nearly going broke fighting the Wounded Warrior Project, having to pay out nearly $80,000 in legal fees in court.

WWP publicly pitches just $19 a month helps, as a donor amount.

There’s also this: